While there are some exceptions, at most universities (especially larger ones), English professors are hired to teach within a specific field, as seen in the professor hired as an expert on Victorian literature, British Drama or 20th-21st-century American Fiction. In addition to teaching courses in their area of specialization, qualified professors are expected to supervise graduate students (who typically share their research interest), participate in the governance of their department and university (such as serving on committees), and to publish articles and books in recognized journals in their field, such as the PMLA.
English teachers work in subject-specific classrooms in middle and high schools, and depending on the grade level and their educational background, may teach a class that specializes in a specific area of English education, such as composition, creative writing, or poetry. In postsecondary schools, English professors rarely teach a generalized course, and often concentrate on studies centered on a certain time period (Elizabethan-Era Literature), a particular genre (the Classics or Feminist Poetry), or specific authors or types of authors (like Shakespeare or African American Novelists).
“Robin was extremely concerned with student learning and wanted to make sure that we understood what she was going over. She also made sure to point out things that could possibly trick us so that we could pay particular attention to them. She reiterated what was said in class and worked out examples so that we could apply it to our practice problems and exam questions.” – Rachel F., UCLA
Online tutors work with students of varying abilities and ages. Most have at least a master’s degree and are paid on an hourly basis. Tutors may work from anywhere in the world as long as they have a computer and Internet access (and a U.S. bank account). Peak season for hiring is May through August and November–December every year. Part-time (9–20 hours per week). Paid training of 10–15 hours required.
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