As much as it pains me to write this, my advice is to find a different career. It's not that being a professor is so bad--there are many good things about the job, including a certain amount of flexibility of schedule and the experience of going to work and learning alongside colleagues and students each day--but the job market is just. so. bad. Odds are that you will labor for 6 years to obtain a PhD in English, all the while earning very little money and going into debt, and when you graduate you will be unable to get a tenure-line job--even if you are a gifted teacher, even if you are a talented writer, even if you are a superstar. If you do get a tenure-line job you will find yourself working long hours but earning far less money than do others with advanced degrees, and you will find that the realities of the profession are out of line with what you imagine the profession to be. I once believed that I would have the leisure to think and to write--that's what professors do, right? Not so much. When I was much younger I even imagined that I would spend some time each day sitting under a tree and reading a book. I'm serious! I thought that. My life bears zero resemblance to the fantasy. The ground under the trees is always a little wet, and there's too much of a glare on my laptop to work outside.


Postsecondary teachers have more flexibility over the format of their instructional methods than their K-12 counterparts. They also have greater control over their schedules, with many postsecondary instructors teaching part time, as well as full time. They have fewer classroom management and procedural responsibilities than grade-school teachers but are expected to devote significant time to preparing lectures and instructions for assignments, in addition to evaluating and providing individual guidance to students when necessary.
Try to identify subjects, assignments, and tests that will require a tutoring session as early as possible. As the semester goes on, tutors get busier and their schedules get harder to coordinate. The best online services will still be able to find you a tutor on-demand, but there is no guarantee that your preferred tutor will be available if you wait until the last minute to book an appointment.
Remember, the concept of arbitrage is based on the principle that a particular good has a higher price in one place than it does in another. That might mean it sells for more in California than it does in New York. But it might also mean that it sells for more online than it does in a brick-and-mortar store. Winning at arbitrage means knowing how to figure out which items to buy and which ones to walk away from. 
Answer: In addition to teaching in US schools, English teachers are in high demand overseas. There are many programs that connect recent English graduates with school districts abroad for beginning teaching experience. English teachers may also find job opportunities in the private sector tutoring and coaching English language learners for multi-national corporations.
I'm a recent MIT graduate and a current Vanderbilt Medical Student. I have a Bachelor's in Science in Chemistry and Biology, and am very passionate about science! I took mostly AP and IB courses while in high school, and received high scores on all of the exams, so I am very familiar with AP material! I have been a teaching assitant for high school students while at MIT, and am really great at explaining difficult concepts in easy ways! I would love to help increase your understanding in science and math subjects! ... View Profile

“My students write passion blogs, go on Instagram sensory walks, engage in both synchronous and asynchronous discussions about literature, annotate digitally online, and create multimedia digital portfolios to share with the world! I feel fortunate to teach at a time when there is so much information right at our fingertips and so many new approaches to teaching.”
Online tutors work with students of varying abilities and ages. Most have at least a master’s degree and are paid on an hourly basis. Tutors may work from anywhere in the world as long as they have a computer and Internet access (and a U.S. bank account). Peak season for hiring is May through August and November–December every year. Part-time (9–20 hours per week). Paid training of 10–15 hours required.
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