If you only love your content, and not kids, DON'T do it. Frequently English majors love literature, or grammar, or writing, but they aren't passionate about helping kids. Don't let your NEED to cover content outweigh the real work of helping kids. Be prepared to feel tired and under appreciated, but know that one day, the least likely kid will come back and tell you that you are the reason they made it. That is why you teach.

Not everyone can teach, no matter how knowledgeable he or she is in any subject. I began teaching Grammar, and quickly learned the text the students were made to buy was extremely puzzling...so I made up my own weekly Grammar Packages. Then I started teaching Composition 101 and learned that the most difficult task for students is focus...working on this alone helped many of my students. Later I taught Intro to Literature. This became a passion of mine because I had to allow for many different insights to a poem or story. Keeping in mind that another won't quite reach the same conclusion to Literary Writings made teaching this subject very successful for me.
My students do well!  I am a chemical engineer.  I know math and science well.  I have tutored students after work for 12 years.  I know students well.  I work with a student to find the knowledge holes that cause problems.  I explain the missing concept and then explain it again from a second angle.  I work through the problem with the student and watch him do it again.  When we find and correct holes in the student's knowledge base, he is caught up and ready to excel in his class.  He often finds that he doesn't need a tutor any more -- not great for my business model, but definitely my goal. ... View Profile
Place of employment has a profound effect on the salary that an English teacher earns, as jobs associated with higher education tend to pay more. However, unlike other teaching professions, top-paying employment opportunities for postsecondary English teachers are not found at colleges, universities and professional schools, but instead at junior colleges, where professors earned an annual mean wage of $69,110 compared to the $68,580 earned at colleges and universities in 2014.
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