Even spending a few hours a month on website maintenance for a small business can bring in a good amount of extra income and gives you the opportunity to make connections that might come in handy as references for future job applications. If you good at search engine optimization or affiliate marketing you can charge a pretty penny to help out with that as well.
Because the fee is so small but the task takes so little time, the strategy is to do as many of them as possible. However, be sure to read the fine print because many of these companies have a minimum payout, meaning that if you earn $8.55 doing 20 micro jobs, you may have to wait until you’ve earned as much as $50 to actually get your money. Read more about some of the pitfalls of this kind of work.
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
That doesn’t mean the job is legitimate (or the recruiter is who he claims to be). You should always do your due diligence on both the recruiter and the job. Conduct research online to see if you can find out any info on the recruiter/hiring manager to determine if they are indeed a real person. You should be able to find an online trail verifying the person, and, if not, you may want to reconsider moving forward with the job process.
What It Is: Companies like Google and Yahoo give you information to search for, and you tell them how closely their results matched what you were looking for. Does a search for Lady Antebellum turn up sites about the music group or links to pre-Civil War period information? If you are Latina, for example, you might be asked to search the way a Spanish speaker might perform a search in English.
Online tutors must be enrolled in (or have graduated) from an American or Canadian college or university and be available to work from 2 p.m. to 1 a.m., Eastern Standard Time. Pay begins at $12 per hour in addition to incentives. Tutors, who are independent contractors must commit to at least 5 hours per week. U.S. residents only. Part-time work available.
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