Do not expect your students to be English majors. Understand that they don't all share the love of reading and writing and all things literary. If you understand that; if you meet them where THEY are (not where you expect or want them to be); if you are flexible with your time and your resources; and if the curriculum is not always the stuff the kids NEED to know, you'll be just fine. Also, keep granola bars in your desk drawer for the kids who didn't get breakfast (or for when you forget your lunch on the kitchen counter), let students stand up and move around a lot - literature is really, really boring for some (I know, weird, right?), and even honors students can try your patience daily.

Every service is different, but most follow the same basic model. Once you’ve registered, you simply select the topic and grade level you need help with, and the system will give you a list of qualified tutors. From there, you can view a detailed profile of each, send an introductory email, submit a question, or schedule a future session. If you’re using an on-demand service, the system will automatically pair you with an available qualified tutor and drop you right into a live session.
...throughout my own schooling. I have also taken an authoritative role in forming study groups and am very efficient at building concept maps, flashcards, venn diagrams, and other organized study tools for others. For the MCAT, I have encountered the new 2016 version as a student myself and therefore am able to better understand the struggles students like me may face as they undertake the journey to this very important test. I am aware of...

'Module 3: Planning Online Learning' will explore the importance of planning online learning from a pedagogical perspective rather than a technology driven one. Careful planning is one of the most important aspects of teaching online, and success often depends upon taking the time to consider all of the different aspects of the online learning experience before you begin. The content and activities will explore the concepts of constructive alignment, choosing which aspects of a class are best done online or face-to-face, building digital literacy capabilities within your students, and examining your own motivations for wanting to teach online in the first place. 'Module 4: Online Learning Activities' will identify important considerations you need to keep in mind when developing online learning activities for your students. We will offer advice about how to plan an online activity, and help you think about which may be appropriate for your own students. When you are new to the process, understanding which online technology best supports different learning activities can be daunting. This module, along with a range of case studies, and activities, will explore the relationship between different technologies and specific activities in more depth.
Most states require at least a bachelor’s degree when you first seek a state certification or license. Each state will have a list of accredited institutions that are qualified to award a degree appropriate for licensing. As you look through your choice of schools, you will want to cross reference them with the State Board of Education’s approved list of schools (completing a degree program that isn’t accredited can result in disqualification for licensing).

This online teaching service connects students to tutors from computers in their local library, community center, school, ​after-school program, or from home. To become certified as an online tutor, you must have a degree from or be enrolled in a U.S. or Canadian college, then you must pass a test in your area of specialty and submit a writing sample. The process takes 1–3 weeks. Pay is based on the subject tutored and the number of hours tutored.

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