As much as it pains me to write this, my advice is to find a different career. It's not that being a professor is so bad--there are many good things about the job, including a certain amount of flexibility of schedule and the experience of going to work and learning alongside colleagues and students each day--but the job market is just. so. bad. Odds are that you will labor for 6 years to obtain a PhD in English, all the while earning very little money and going into debt, and when you graduate you will be unable to get a tenure-line job--even if you are a gifted teacher, even if you are a talented writer, even if you are a superstar. If you do get a tenure-line job you will find yourself working long hours but earning far less money than do others with advanced degrees, and you will find that the realities of the profession are out of line with what you imagine the profession to be. I once believed that I would have the leisure to think and to write--that's what professors do, right? Not so much. When I was much younger I even imagined that I would spend some time each day sitting under a tree and reading a book. I'm serious! I thought that. My life bears zero resemblance to the fantasy. The ground under the trees is always a little wet, and there's too much of a glare on my laptop to work outside.

'Module 1: Why is Online Teaching Important' is about understanding where you are in the current educational landscape, and determining where you want to be. We will explore why online teaching is relevant to your teaching practice, and you’ll have an opportunity to reflect upon the opportunities and challenges you face in your own context. 'Module 2: Open and Institutionally Supported Technologies' focuses on helping you understand the benefits and restrictions of both broad categories of technologies. We’re all familiar with different social media technologies, and many of us will be aware of larger institutional online learning systems. In this module we will ask you to think about the reasons why you might want to use freely available online tools for your teaching - or your institution's learning management system. Important considerations such as which types of technologies are suitable for a range of different activities will also be explored.

I have been tutoring with Louisiana State University Shreveport for one semester, but have been leading group study sessions since my freshmen year of college. I first encountered the Student Success Center in the fall of 2017 when I attended a Supplemental Instruction Session for Organic Chemistry I. I found the sessions so helpful in allowing me to further understand the difficult concepts of the course through metacognitive intervention that I attended every session after that. The results of attending those sessions reflected in my grades, and I passed the course with an A. Not only did I receive helpful instruction through the Student Success Center, my confidence in my academic ability grew as well. I wanted to offer this same helpfulness and confidence to my peers, so I sought to tutor for the Student Success Center to use the same learning strategies that helped me to help my peers.
Don’t be shy when working with your course creators: Find out the most common issues, technical or otherwise, and they can put together a list of fixes you can draw from to help students experiencing problems. You should also have tech backup to whom you can refer students—make sure you get that phone number or email address too, and save yourself a struggle with tech issues that may be someone else’s responsibility.
I'm a professional English teacher. I have a TEFL qualification and I have been teaching since 1999. My career started in Japan where I was a conversational English teacher. Within a year I had become the headmaster of a private English school serving 400 students. In 2014 I returned to the UK where I established an online presence. In 2016 I became an MBA consultant preparing students for the rigorous admissions test and interview. If you are preparing for the VIVA interview, I can help with that too. I'm a published author with many years experience proofreading. I'd be happy to have a look at your essays. I am very patient, and you can ask me all the questions you want, as many times as you want, until you understand very well. Let me know what you need and how I can help you, and I will be here for you. I will do my best to help you achieve your goals of becoming fluent in English. I'll introduce a bit more information about me. I am British and I live in Bournemouth. I'm a B1 speaker of Japanese. After a career in the civil service in England, I travelled to New Zealand where I resided for 8 years. I attended university there and studied computer science at Massey University. In New Zealand and then moved into the private sector where I gained experience in the technology market and the insurance industry. In 1998, I resumed my education and took a CELTA course to pursue a dream of teaching English in Japan. After gaining some experience in a school in Saitama, I opened my own schools in Chiba and Tokyo and became a registered Japanese corporation. I employed 10 Japanese support staff and several foreign teachers. I ran those schools for 16 years and taught hundreds of students of all ages and levels. In my downtime, I like to watch movies and read books. I’m the author of the book Fluency Secrets and I’m writing some new books on English language study. I love mountain biking, running and swimming. One day I would like to do a triathlon. See you online!
Whether you’re a stay-at-home mom who hasn’t done any office work in a while or you’re 18 and just started college, you may worry the work-at-home life isn’t for you. Not because you don’t have the time or the temperament. But because you’re worried you don’t have enough experience to land a work-from-home job or, if you do, that the work won’t be easy enough to slip in around a long day with the kids or all your classes.
Overall, teachers trained to teach students English concepts face varying levels of employment opportunities, which are dependent on a range of factors, such as retiring teachers leaving behind vacancies at local schools. Additionally, student populations in K-12 schools in the West and South are expected to rise, thus contributing to the need to hire more teachers to accommodate the influx. School districts situated in rural and urban areas also tend to have a higher demand to hire teachers.
With the continued growth of online job opportunities, many people will find that the information found online can often be cluttered or misleading. While several sites try to feed readers with false information regarding online job opportunities and unreasonable salaries for little to no work, working your way around that clutter may be a challenge.
Postsecondary English language and literature teachers earned a median salary of $60,920, according to BLS data for 2013, a slight increase from 2012. The statistics cover English teachers working at colleges, universities and professional schools at the local and state levels, and for private institutions. On average, university and four-year college teachers earn higher salaries than their counterparts at junior colleges.
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English teachers work in subject-specific classrooms in middle and high schools, and depending on the grade level and their educational background, may teach a class that specializes in a specific area of English education, such as composition, creative writing, or poetry. In postsecondary schools, English professors rarely teach a generalized course, and often concentrate on studies centered on a certain time period (Elizabethan-Era Literature), a particular genre (the Classics or Feminist Poetry), or specific authors or types of authors (like Shakespeare or African American Novelists).

While most of the companies we looked at charge a flat rate for one-hour sessions, Skooli offers four separate options: pay as you go, 5-hour packages, 10-hour packages, and 20-hour packages. The more sessions you purchase upfront, the more money you save. Skooli also has a free trial, so you can decide if it’s the right fit for you before committing to any of its programs.
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