If you're considering graduate school and teaching on the college level, understand that you HAVE to love what you do. You will have to start as an adjunct and work several part time jobs to make ends meet, but if you really love the work, you won't mind doing it. In these beginning years, you have to really work to find that work/life balance. I often have to tell students if I'm going away for the weekend and won't be able to keep to my 24-hour response promise. I do take one or two weekend getaways each semester to keep myself sane :) If you love it, it really won't feel like work!
Some students decide to teach after they have already completed their bachelor’s degree in English or a related field. In this case, an alternative route to teaching certification may be a good fit. Many universities also offer master’s in education degree programs designed for prospective teachers. Regardless of which road is taken, the student must also pass a series of state tests to earn teacher certification. At least one semester of student teaching is required in most states, and some universities require one to three semesters of observations in a classroom.
As much as it pains me to write this, my advice is to find a different career. It's not that being a professor is so bad--there are many good things about the job, including a certain amount of flexibility of schedule and the experience of going to work and learning alongside colleagues and students each day--but the job market is just. so. bad. Odds are that you will labor for 6 years to obtain a PhD in English, all the while earning very little money and going into debt, and when you graduate you will be unable to get a tenure-line job--even if you are a gifted teacher, even if you are a talented writer, even if you are a superstar. If you do get a tenure-line job you will find yourself working long hours but earning far less money than do others with advanced degrees, and you will find that the realities of the profession are out of line with what you imagine the profession to be. I once believed that I would have the leisure to think and to write--that's what professors do, right? Not so much. When I was much younger I even imagined that I would spend some time each day sitting under a tree and reading a book. I'm serious! I thought that. My life bears zero resemblance to the fantasy. The ground under the trees is always a little wet, and there's too much of a glare on my laptop to work outside.
For people looking for information on how to teach English online, the process can often be intimidating.  There are seemingly countless online teaching jobs out there with different rates of pay, requirements, and students.  While many schools and jobs are straightforward, we have received more than a few messages complaining about how the details seem to change from one job to the next.

High school English teachers are charged with preparing students for the college and this means, they are not only expected to introduce students to a range of literary traditions but also ensure that students have the reading comprehension and writing skills required to pass college admissions tests, such as the SAT, as well as succeed at the post-secondary level.
This online teaching service connects students to tutors from computers in their local library, community center, school, ​after-school program, or from home. To become certified as an online tutor, you must have a degree from or be enrolled in a U.S. or Canadian college, then you must pass a test in your area of specialty and submit a writing sample. The process takes 1–3 weeks. Pay is based on the subject tutored and the number of hours tutored.
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