Wow! This is a tough one. Honestly, don't do it if you cannot stand kids/young adults. Don't think that a high school class is going to be anything like your LIT 451 class - you know, where all 15 of you sit down with the professor and discuss Frankenstein through a Freudian lens. Don't think that all your kids are going to like reading Jane Eyre because you like it. Know that parents are going to blame you for every horrid grade/missing assignment. Know that when you finally get used to one lesson plan format or standardized test, that the state will change it and you'll have to learn something new. Understand, quickly, that the bad days will probably outweigh the good ones, but that it only takes one student to grow to love reading to make you feel accomplished and appreciated. Understand that students rarely will understand why they have to read classics and why your class is important when they know they want to major in Biology, but that in a few years one of them will send you a letter in the mail thanking you for all you did for them.
Depending on the exact class that is taught, English teachers can teach creative writing, which focuses on narratives, prose, and poetry. English teachers may also teach students how to write essays, argumentative pieces, news articles, or reports. Oral and written communication skills are tasks that English teachers help develop, as is problem solving skills, critical thinking, and reasoning. Quite often, English teachers are required to teach remedial classes involving grammar and writing skills. English teachers may also work on teaching students how to speak, read, and write English as a second language. This position offers a great opportunity for diversity.
This guide provides teachers with strategies for helping students understand the differences between persuasive writing and evidence-based argumentation. Students become familiar with the basic components of an argument and then develop their understanding by analyzing evidence-based arguments about texts. Students then generate evidence-based arguments of texts using a variety of resources. Links to related resources and additional classroom strategies are also provided. Designed for grades 6-12.
'Module 1: Why is Online Teaching Important' is about understanding where you are in the current educational landscape, and determining where you want to be. We will explore why online teaching is relevant to your teaching practice, and you’ll have an opportunity to reflect upon the opportunities and challenges you face in your own context. 'Module 2: Open and Institutionally Supported Technologies' focuses on helping you understand the benefits and restrictions of both broad categories of technologies. We’re all familiar with different social media technologies, and many of us will be aware of larger institutional online learning systems. In this module we will ask you to think about the reasons why you might want to use freely available online tools for your teaching - or your institution's learning management system. Important considerations such as which types of technologies are suitable for a range of different activities will also be explored.
Good programs understand this and provide their own tech support staff. This resource is also available to professors, who will want immediate help should their PowerPoint presentations crash during class time. Removing this burden from teachers allows them to focus on their lessons, while students can rest easy knowing there’s help for any issues they may encounter.

When I finally realized that I was new and that no haircut or name change would fix that, I felt liberated. If you try to pressure yourself to be a veteran in the classroom on day 1, it will just add more stress than you need. Now, my students call me Alexia and know I've only been teaching for two years. I feel like it's helped facilitate a stronger bond in the classroom.


“When I resigned as Director of the Heritage Project, I faced a choice: whether to go back into school administration or back into the classroom. The only job I ended up applying for is the teaching job I have now. I love spending my time thinking about the things that really matter by re-reading great literature daily, and it’s impossible not to love young people. Trying to show them the best ways into life — what else is there?”
To become an online teacher, you need at least a bachelor’s degree in education, or the subject you wish to teach. For example, chemistry teachers should have a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. Many teachers pursue a master's degree or doctorate which makes them eligible for administrative positions. Online teachers who work with public school programs also need a teaching license or certificate, which may entail more coursework and the passing of a certification exam. State requirements vary, so research the qualifications where you live. Private schools and educational organizations may not need a teaching license, but having one may increase your chances in the job market. Some online teachers first gain experience in the classroom or by tutoring students to develop teaching techniques before seeking online teaching positions.
'Module 3: Planning Online Learning' will explore the importance of planning online learning from a pedagogical perspective rather than a technology driven one. Careful planning is one of the most important aspects of teaching online, and success often depends upon taking the time to consider all of the different aspects of the online learning experience before you begin. The content and activities will explore the concepts of constructive alignment, choosing which aspects of a class are best done online or face-to-face, building digital literacy capabilities within your students, and examining your own motivations for wanting to teach online in the first place. 'Module 4: Online Learning Activities' will identify important considerations you need to keep in mind when developing online learning activities for your students. We will offer advice about how to plan an online activity, and help you think about which may be appropriate for your own students. When you are new to the process, understanding which online technology best supports different learning activities can be daunting. This module, along with a range of case studies, and activities, will explore the relationship between different technologies and specific activities in more depth.
Postsecondary English teachers teach in lecture halls, medium-size classrooms and even online. They specialize in literature and writing and often focus on teaching tomorrow’s English teachers, who earn credentials to teach K-6, intermediate-level or high school students. College English teachers frequently serve as role models for English majors who also aspire to become teachers.

Postsecondary English language and literature teachers earned a median salary of $60,920, according to BLS data for 2013, a slight increase from 2012. The statistics cover English teachers working at colleges, universities and professional schools at the local and state levels, and for private institutions. On average, university and four-year college teachers earn higher salaries than their counterparts at junior colleges.
Your tutor is more than willing to work through your homework with you, but remember that your time each session is limited. If you attempt your homework ahead of your appointment, your tutor can quickly review it to identify the areas where you need help. If you wait until your session to start it together, you could end up spending the entire session working through problems that you understand before you get to the ones you don’t.
This course will guide you through your journey of understanding how online technologies can enhance your course design. You will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of effective online teaching practices and their relationship to the use of different technologies. You will also be encouraged to progressively design and reflect upon your own online learning activity, assessment or resource for use in your own class if you choose to undertake the course assignments.
While there are some exceptions, at most universities (especially larger ones), English professors are hired to teach within a specific field, as seen in the professor hired as an expert on Victorian literature, British Drama or 20th-21st-century American Fiction. In addition to teaching courses in their area of specialization, qualified professors are expected to supervise graduate students (who typically share their research interest), participate in the governance of their department and university (such as serving on committees), and to publish articles and books in recognized journals in their field, such as the PMLA.
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I am also new to the work from home world but not that new. I have done some work with MCA and SFI. Neither worked for me well. But I am a young stay at home mother of four, all children being 5 and under. And I’m looking for some part time or full time work to support me and the kids. Phone or non-phone is great. I prefer non-phone work because of the kids. And non-writing as well. Thanks for your help. 🙂
How many students can benefit from this service? How many grade levels does it cover? How many individual subjects? Services that catered to the most grade levels and offered help in the most subjects scored highest. We also gave special consideration to companies that include test prep options and special instruction to students with learning disabilities.
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