As much as it pains me to write this, my advice is to find a different career. It's not that being a professor is so bad--there are many good things about the job, including a certain amount of flexibility of schedule and the experience of going to work and learning alongside colleagues and students each day--but the job market is just. so. bad. Odds are that you will labor for 6 years to obtain a PhD in English, all the while earning very little money and going into debt, and when you graduate you will be unable to get a tenure-line job--even if you are a gifted teacher, even if you are a talented writer, even if you are a superstar. If you do get a tenure-line job you will find yourself working long hours but earning far less money than do others with advanced degrees, and you will find that the realities of the profession are out of line with what you imagine the profession to be. I once believed that I would have the leisure to think and to write--that's what professors do, right? Not so much. When I was much younger I even imagined that I would spend some time each day sitting under a tree and reading a book. I'm serious! I thought that. My life bears zero resemblance to the fantasy. The ground under the trees is always a little wet, and there's too much of a glare on my laptop to work outside.
If you only love your content, and not kids, DON'T do it. Frequently English majors love literature, or grammar, or writing, but they aren't passionate about helping kids. Don't let your NEED to cover content outweigh the real work of helping kids. Be prepared to feel tired and under appreciated, but know that one day, the least likely kid will come back and tell you that you are the reason they made it. That is why you teach.
Curiosity is great for learning about the world – and when you make your curiosity into work, you get to call it research and charge a fee! If you enjoy just researching and learning new things, you can find remote jobs that will pay you to either do research and compile data or answer specific questions their clients have. You can do general research or get hyper-specific – for example, in the right location, you could become a court researcher.

I forgot to also share that I will be starting work with On Point as an Advocacy Coordinator too. It sounds like a great job that helps our fellow Americans keep informed about political issues. On Point is the voice of the average citizens that may have an opinion to share with their politicians but have no way of knowing how to contact them. On Point makes sure those voices get heard. In orientation the trainer said she will be hiring agents again around the middle of June. If you have good writing skills and are a good conversationalist then you may want to check it out. It also seems like if you put forth a little effort, you can make decent wages with them and they do pay weekly. I’m not big into politics but excited about this new venture.
These are not get-rich-quick opportunities. You will need to work but the potential is there. As an example, the second one on our list is freelance writing. If you're a good writer, you can hit the ground running and earn hundreds of dollars to write once you find the right clients. If you're not a good writer, you may get paid less as you get better and find more clients. The potential is there but so is the work.
Care.com does not employ any care provider or care seeker nor is it responsible for the conduct of any care provider or care seeker. Care.com provides information and tools to help care seekers and care providers connect and make informed decisions. However, each individual is solely responsible for selecting an appropriate care provider or care seeker for themselves or their families and for complying with all applicable laws in connection with any employment relationship they establish. The information contained in member profiles, job posts and applications are supplied by care providers and care seekers themselves and is not information generated or verified by Care.com. Care.com does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment or engage in any conduct that requires a professional license.
Right now, they probably hate everything that has to do with chemistry. They are struggling with their class and having a hard time putting it all together. What they need now is the right guidance from someone who understands the course materials which is what you will be getting with our chemistry tutoring. If pursuing a degree in chemistry or a related field floats your boat, you might find yourself sinking right now. In high school you never really had any issues with this type of work but not it is getting a lot more challenging and creating several obstacles for you to jump over. Along with that, there are several other things that you have to balance on top of your classes. So you might be feeling overwhelmed and in search of a way out. But what you need to do is take a few deep breaths and reevaluate. These are just a few of the things you will have to overcome while you are in school and then when you start working. You do not want to quit, especially if the chemistry is something that you are passionate about. You need to put in the work with someone who has been where you are. A “chemistry tutor near me” is what you should be searching for to get ahead.
I am also new to the work from home world but not that new. I have done some work with MCA and SFI. Neither worked for me well. But I am a young stay at home mother of four, all children being 5 and under. And I’m looking for some part time or full time work to support me and the kids. Phone or non-phone is great. I prefer non-phone work because of the kids. And non-writing as well. Thanks for your help. 🙂
To benefit our learning community, existing instructors are offered ongoing training and professional development opportunities. These opportunities include (but are not limited to) required training for system and learning resource upgrades and additions. Our Faculty Training & Development team regularly offers a variety of both live and recorded web events for faculty to learn more about SNHU initiatives, engage with representatives from other departments, and explore new ways to engage with students.
In this lesson students analyze the work of winners of the New York Times Learning Network's 2014 Student Editorial Contest as well as professional models from the Times editorial pages to learn how writers effectively introduce and respond to counterarguments. Then they write their own position pieces, incorporating counterarguments to strengthen their claims.
“My students write passion blogs, go on Instagram sensory walks, engage in both synchronous and asynchronous discussions about literature, annotate digitally online, and create multimedia digital portfolios to share with the world! I feel fortunate to teach at a time when there is so much information right at our fingertips and so many new approaches to teaching.”
With surprise news of successful advance-ticket sales of beyond $18,000 for Jason's atypical play, the headmaster is reluctant to miss out on the much-needed cash injection. He backtracks and persuades Linda to return and resume directing duties so the play may go on. However, there still remains another slight bone of contention. The school heads require a new ending for the play as they refuse to sanction the current one which they deem to be overly violent. They fear the parents will be outraged by its dark themes of murder and suicide. When Jason feels betrayed and refuses to rewrite the play's ending, Linda is forced to come up with a suitable replacement herself, lest the entire play is a failure. After much soul searching, she manages to write an improved ending which Jason comes around to accepting when he realises the play will be a roaring success.

Online tutors work with students of varying abilities and ages. Most have at least a master’s degree and are paid on an hourly basis. Tutors may work from anywhere in the world as long as they have a computer and Internet access (and a U.S. bank account). Peak season for hiring is May through August and November–December every year. Part-time (9–20 hours per week). Paid training of 10–15 hours required.
×