That doesn’t mean the job is legitimate (or the recruiter is who he claims to be). You should always do your due diligence on both the recruiter and the job. Conduct research online to see if you can find out any info on the recruiter/hiring manager to determine if they are indeed a real person. You should be able to find an online trail verifying the person, and, if not, you may want to reconsider moving forward with the job process.
If you're considering graduate school and teaching on the college level, understand that you HAVE to love what you do. You will have to start as an adjunct and work several part time jobs to make ends meet, but if you really love the work, you won't mind doing it. In these beginning years, you have to really work to find that work/life balance. I often have to tell students if I'm going away for the weekend and won't be able to keep to my 24-hour response promise. I do take one or two weekend getaways each semester to keep myself sane :) If you love it, it really won't feel like work!
Your tutor is more than willing to work through your homework with you, but remember that your time each session is limited. If you attempt your homework ahead of your appointment, your tutor can quickly review it to identify the areas where you need help. If you wait until your session to start it together, you could end up spending the entire session working through problems that you understand before you get to the ones you don’t.

Online tutors must be enrolled in (or have graduated) from an American or Canadian college or university and be available to work from 2 p.m. to 1 a.m., Eastern Standard Time. Pay begins at $12 per hour in addition to incentives. Tutors, who are independent contractors must commit to at least 5 hours per week. U.S. residents only. Part-time work available.
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