“I absolutely love my profession! The very definition of what it means to be a literate person in our society is rapidly changing because of technology. I enjoy working to support students’ communication skills in the classroom, on paper, and online. I want to make reading and writing relevant to my students’ lives; this requires that I think bigger than simple pen and paper assignments.
Do not expect your students to be English majors. Understand that they don't all share the love of reading and writing and all things literary. If you understand that; if you meet them where THEY are (not where you expect or want them to be); if you are flexible with your time and your resources; and if the curriculum is not always the stuff the kids NEED to know, you'll be just fine. Also, keep granola bars in your desk drawer for the kids who didn't get breakfast (or for when you forget your lunch on the kitchen counter), let students stand up and move around a lot - literature is really, really boring for some (I know, weird, right?), and even honors students can try your patience daily.
I started out simply attending SI for BIOS 110 as a freshman and loved it so much that I used it for as many courses as I could afterward!  These also included my general Chemistry courses, CHEM 121 and CHEM 124.  I started working at the Student Success Center as a tutor and SI instructor last summer.  After almost a year of working, I have led SI sessions for BIOS 101, 110, and 120, and I have held study sessions for CHEM 124.  Having gone through these courses myself and attended SI for my own benefit, I strongly encourage all to take advantage of the Student Success Center's services.
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics current Occupational Outlook Handbook, the median national annual salary for English language and literature teachers, post secondary is $63,730. Actual salaries may vary greatly based on specialization within the field, location, years of experience and a variety of other factors. National long-term projections of employment growth may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions, and do not guarantee actual job growth.
With hundreds of thousands of English teaching jobs opening across the globe each year, opportunities available to you will vary widely. From teaching English to grade school children in Japan to tutoring businessmen in Madrid, jobs will differ when it comes to matters like the type of students you teach, salaries, and your daily schedule. Practical matters like housing options, visas & health insurance options will also vary. Check out more than 300 TEFL articles & FAQs to learn more about the ins-and-outs of teaching English in 100 countries around the world.
Some English teachers also teach journalism and yearbook courses, drama, public speaking, debate, and a variety of specialized writing classes that focus on magazine, fiction, early romantic, neoclassical or biographical writing. Regardless of their area of expertise, all English teachers are expected to have a firm grasp of vocabulary, grammar, sentence structure and written communication rules.
Our trained job research team weeds out both the obvious scams and the more sophisticated ones, along with commission-only jobs, low-quality positions, “business opportunities,” and other junk so our members are guaranteed a scam-free job search experience. Wherever else you might be searching online, keep in mind these scam warning signs and tips to stay safe and find a legitimate online job!
Online tutors must be enrolled in (or have graduated) from an American or Canadian college or university and be available to work from 2 p.m. to 1 a.m., Eastern Standard Time. Pay begins at $12 per hour in addition to incentives. Tutors, who are independent contractors must commit to at least 5 hours per week. U.S. residents only. Part-time work available.
×