This is probably the most comprehensive Kindle article I’ve ever read. As someone who’s been in publishing for many years and seen eBooks grow from internet marketers to the general public, and therefore being abused by authors who don’t know any better, I thank you for posting the importance of audience, a decent cover, and especially proper formatting.
If you’re asking if you should learn how to make ePub and Mobi files on your own, I’d say you don’t want to — hire a pro if you want to control those files and be able to sell all formats on your own site, as you can see me doing here: http://www.makealivingwriting.com/ebooks. Also hire someone if you want great design — it does make a difference in sales, in my experience.
'The Book-hunter in London' is the outcome not only of material which has been accumulating for many years past, from published and unpublished sources, but also of a long and pleasant intercourse with the leading book-collectors and booksellers in London, not to mention a vigorous and constant prosecution of one of the most pleasant and instructive of hobbies. The author has freely availed himself of the information in the works of Dibdin, Nichols, and other writers on the subject, but their statements have been verified whenever possible, and acknowledgements have been made in the proper places to the authorities laid under contribution. [more][Less]
eBook Converter can be viewed as a one-size-fits-all method to modify the format of an existing e-book file. This can be very useful, for there are many times when specific devices will not recognise a certain format. The ability to convert this data into a readable file will allow individuals to access a text regardless of where it is being displayed.
I should also say that everybody comes to the self-publishing process with a different agenda -- and a different book --and some e-book self-publishing options will appeal to you based on the type of book you have (aside from the iBooks Author reference, this article is slanted to publishing more text-based e-books rather than books with lots of illustrations or graphic images, such as children's books). For those who are publishing an e-book as an experiment or "just to get it out there" and who are less concerned with making money and extracting every last dime out of a sale, aggregators offer a convenient solution to get your book in a variety of e-book stores and roll up your sales into one single record that you can easily track (most companies pay out earnings from e-books within 60 to 90 days; Amazon is 60).

Scribd has added HTML5 coding, so your document can easily be read on the iPad via the Safari browser (this allows you to use Apple's finger-based, pinch-and-spread touch zoom controls). Currently, the majority of documents posted to Scribd are free to view or download (it's a great way to post samples of your work), but you can sell your work on Scribd as well. (If you want to see an example, I posted a free excerpt of my own book to Scribd. Alas, I should have made my cover larger so it didn't have a white border, but so it goes).
Now, after being greatly upset by the above post, we after all are just myself, my wife and a couple of writer friends trying to do something new and different, I decided to do some searching on the net and found a site closely related to our name (zippyshare) which DOES have quite a shady reputation as both spammer and illegal downloader, but I want to make the readers here at Library Thing aware that those folks have NOTHING to do with us. (I picked HotZippy because I thought it had a cute sounding name like Google or Kobo etc and probably should have looked a little more closely, though I never anticipated something such as this happening to us.)
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